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Veterans

When our armed forces return from combat, the impact it has on their lives is lasting, though not always evident. For many, they are returning with invisible wounds, that left untreated, can turn into scars.

It's no secret that personal attention in the classroom can deliver big results on a report card. For children of military families, that extra kindness can be even more crucial. Frequent moves and the stress caused by having a parent on deployment can take a toll. But a special group of military kids in Dover, DE is getting a little support from a few great Grandparents.

One wouldn't expect to see a 90-year-old wandering the corridors of Remann Hall, a juvenile detention center in Tacoma, WA. However, Del Rotan, a World War II veteran, has made Remann Hall his “second home,” mentoring at-risk youth at the facility for 16 years as a foster grandparent.

Todd Schnittke proudly served his country during the Gulf War as a Multiple Launch Rocket System Technician from 1989-1993. Yet, he had a will to continue his service to the United States that never disappeared. Now, he proudly serves under another title – AmeriCorps member at the AMVETs Career Center in Mansfield, Ohio.

Today, we're pleased to share the truly inspiring story of Habitat for Humanity AmeriCorps member Regina Best.

A U.S. Air Force veteran, Regina Best was recently homeless and became so passionate about service that she spent months building homes for others before finding one for herself. Now in her own apartment and back in school, Best is determined to keep serving well beyond her AmeriCorps term.

The Service News Digest is a regular feature on the Serve.gov blog. In this series, we showcase articles that feature national service and Corporation for National and Community Service programs. Take a look at some of the great stories that had people talking recently.

On March 17th and 18th, Habitat for Humanity of the Chesapeake and the Corporation for National and Community Service teamed up with more than 125 veterans, active duty military, and AmeriCorps members to help build and rehabilitate homes in Annapolis and Baltimore.

Paul Reickhoff, president and CEO of the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, has an idea about a great, untapped American resource. He believes national service models based on AmeriCorps to harness and leverage the skills of military veterans and can “help people think about us as the cavalry, not as a problem.

As we celebrate the 4th of July, we celebrate our patriotism and the millions who have shown their love
of country by wearing the uniform. There are a few Veterans among us -- 16,000 so far -- who came
home and volunteered for a second time and served their communities though AmeriCorps.

The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) just announced a tremendous commitment to support veterans and military families at the National Conference on Volunteering and Service. From expanded grants to increased “people power” in areas of need, we are ready to stand with our soldiers to provide opportunities that will help them continue their service here at home while we serve their special needs.

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