Friday, August 01, 2014 AddThis Social Bookmark Button En Español - http://www.servir.gov/
Home United We Serve National Service

Senior Corps

In Gen. George Washington’s farewell orders to the Continental Army, he encouraged the soldiers who united in battle to not only maintain their bond as a “patriotic band of Brothers” but to carry forward the virtues they had learned during military service when they returned home. His wisdom still rings true today, as we see example after example of our soldiers continuing to serve their communities after their military commitments end.

It’s nearly impossible to find a silver lining in events like Hurricane Sandy. But the outpouring of volunteers from the affected communities and around the country who pulled together after the storm to do anything from running shelters, to feeding the displaced, to mucking and gutting homes revealed the heart of a caring nation.

Each day, thousands of AmeriCorps and Senior Corps national service members devote themselves to service that directly impacts the lives of children around the country.

Last week, members of the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) family joined Volunteer West Virginia and the Citizens Conservation Corps of West Virginia as more than 40,000 volunteers descended on the Mountain State to perform 350 service projects across nine counties.

Three years ago Chris Oliver was unemployed and facing homelessness after being evicted from his Dallas apartment. He turned to City Square, a local nonprofit that provides vital services to neighbors struggling with poverty. City Square didn't just help Chris put food on the table – it gave him a second chance on life. He joined City Square's AmeriCorps program, where he served for two years. Now Chris has a full-time position working in the organization's homeless outreach program.

When Joseph Aragon heads to school in the morning you won't find him toting a backpack stuffed with school supplies or carrying a lunchbox. Instead, this 64 year-old brings with him a lifetime of experience and knowledge to share with the students of Blanche Pope Elementary School on the Hawaiian Homestead land in Waimanalo.

Monday’s Senior Corps luncheon brought together more than 700 program directors to hear Senior Corps Director Dr. Erwin Tan discuss the program’s strategic direction and celebrate RSVP’s 40th Anniversary.

Nancy Ryan was a full-time caregiver for her husband, a full-time job without any fanfare. Without much help, she carried on each day making sure her husband had the love and care needed to make it through each day. Through the RSVP Boone County Adult Caregiver Respite Program, Ryan was able to take a break and do the little things one may take for granted -- run a quick errand or grab a bite to eat.

Seeing is believing. RSVP volunteers in Indiana believe that all children have the right to see and see well. And thanks to Prevent Blindness Indiana, which trains RSVPs to conduct vision tests, they can play an important role in making sure that happens.

59-year-old Lillie Lanser is one of the millions of Americans affected by the economic downturn. She spent years as a legal secretary, but when she was laid off in 2009, Lanser realized that unemployment allowed her to pursue a new direction in her life – service. As a volunteer, she found a passion for giving back and created the Cancer Pilot Transport Program while an RSVP volunteer with Senior Corps.

Pages

Stay in Touch

Follow us on the following social networks, to ensure that you are always up to date!

Tell us how we're doing: serviceinitiative@cns.gov

National Service websites:

Back to Top